Overcoming the Challenges of Launching, Manufacturing, & Scaling A Product | Shubham Issar

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Shubham Issar, industrial designer and co-founder of SoaPen INC, an organization with a mission to make hand hygiene fun and accessible for everyone.  Shubham talks to Ryan about how her background of growing up in India inspired the co-creation of SoaPen, and the challenges that come with funding, manufacturing, and scaling a product. 

She also shares her experiences in participating in multiple competitions and pitch events to get funding and what challenges she and her partner have had to overcome due to COVID. Shubham emphasizes the importance of networking and relying on peers, mentors, and business experts to see the success of her product launch. 

Listen to Shubham share with Ryan how SoaPen is impacting the lives of so many children and revolutionizing the way we think about handwashing.  

Find more There to Here Podcast Episodes with Ryan Dye

Show Links:

SaoPen

Key points:


1:08 — Shubham’s background

3:08 —  What inspired SoaPen 

3:45 — Infant mortality rates 

4:30 — How soapen works for kids

5:30 — How the challenges spark creativity

6:58 — Making the prototype 

8:55 — Challenges of age in development products

10:36 — Protecting IP – trademarks 

11:41 — How has covid impacted the demand of Soapen

13:15 — Making business decisions 

14:50 — Importance of peer support as entrepreneurs

15:33 — Pitch events

16:00 — James Dyson award process

16:30 — Foundation support & mentorship 

17:21 — Challenges of scaling SoaPen

19:15 — Exploring other types of funding 

21:14 — Highlights of the experience 

22:26 — Manufacturing challenges 

23:20 — Mentoring & networking 

24:16 — Partnership dynamics 

25:15 — The impact of creativity in children on SoaPen 

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Episode Transcript

Ryan Dye:
From CoLab INC, it’s There To Here. A show about entrepreneurs, innovators and mentors and the impact they seek to make on the world. I’m Ryan Dye, Executive Director of CoLab and on today’s show we talk to Shubham Issar, co-founder of SoaPen Inc. As part of the 2017 class of Forbes 30 under 30, Shubham and her business partner Amanat Anand, both graduates of the Parson School of design developed SoaPen with a mission to make hand hygiene fun and accessible all over the world. Shubham, thanks so much for being part of There To Here Podcast.

Shubham Issar:
Thank you so much for having me.

Ryan Dye:
Did I get your names correct?

Shubham Issar:
Yeah, actually I was going to say that’s one of the best pronunciations.

Ryan Dye:
Oh. You’ve made my day. You’ve made my day, that’s excellent.

Shubham Issar:
I always tell people, “It’s like a shoe and a bomb.”

Ryan Dye:
Shubham.

Shubham Issar:
Shubham.

Ryan Dye:
Yeah, I like it. No, I’m glad I got that right. That’s good. I’ve been known to murder names, so I tried not to do that. So tell us a little bit about your background and what led you to the Parsons School of Design in New York?

Shubham Issar:
Grew up in New Delhi in India. I went to high school in India. After graduate, I went… I think I was in 10th grade and my sister, who is a scientist now was like, “What do you want to do?” And I had no idea. I always knew… growing up, I always knew that I was really interested in… I was very creative kid growing up. I was very interested in doodling and arts and craft, so I always knew I wanted to be in that… in a creative field, but I never wanted to be an artist, and in my mind, I didn’t really know that there were other fields. In the creative field, I can be things other than just being a painter or-

Ryan Dye:
Sure.

Shubham Issar:
Just an artist, which is what was popularized back home and then I started really looking into other things that exist, and when I was going to college my whole idea was, “Oh, I want to be a book jacket designer. That’s it. I want to be an illustrator who makes fun book covers.”

Ryan Dye:
Yeah, that’s cool.

Shubham Issar:
Yeah, because I always judged a book by its cover. If I didn’t like the book, I was not going to read it.

Ryan Dye:
I’m not reading this.

Shubham Issar:
I’m not reading that. I started applying to design colleges, that was my idea and then I found the Parsons School of Design. I grew up in a city. I didn’t think I could live anywhere other than in a large city and it’s the best design school in the world. So it was a combination of really liking the programs that the school offered and being in New York City specifically.

Ryan Dye:
Well New York City is really small compared to New Delhi.

Shubham Issar:
In terms of people and obviously also yeah, the space. Both my co-founder and I are from New Delhi and we never met in Delhi before, and I feel like every time we get interviewed together everyone’s like, “Oh, so did you guys know each other in Delhi?” We’re like, “No.”

Ryan Dye:
No.

Shubham Issar:
Massive space.

Ryan Dye:
Yeah, that’s interesting.

Shubham Issar:
I moved New York to go to the Parsons School of Design in 2011. Came with an undecided major, but realized I really liked working with my hands and-

Ryan Dye:
Sure.

Shubham Issar:
Yeah, then [inaudible] industrial design program.

Ryan Dye:
Wait, while you were at school, when you met your business partner and decided “Oh, we’re going to develop this product.” How did SoaPen come about? What triggered that?

Shubham Issar:
Well Amanat and I, we really liked working with each other, even in college. We did a lot of furniture design programs, that’s what our major was and then after graduating, we were both working with design and build firm. We knew that we were really attracted to the idea of design for good and just being in social innovation specifically, so we were looking for design competitions to apply to post graduating. We found the UNICEF variables for good challenge online, which highlighted a lot of problems that mothers and infants around the world were facing. Things like maternal health, lack of emergency responses and the one call to action that really spoke to us was the high rates of infant mortality rates, and one statistic that was stated in the brief was that over 1.5 million child under the age of five die due to infectious illnesses, and more than 50% of these can be avoided by just washing your hands with soap.
That was just so shocking to me, because-

Ryan Dye:
Sure.

Shubham Issar:
I grew up in India. A lot of these statistics were based on Indian case studies. It’s crazy to see those statistics in real life and realize “Wow, there are so many kids back home that don’t have the privilege that Amanat and I grew up with.” We had parents who knew the importance of hand washing with soap. So that’s what triggered it all. We wanted to make something that would make hand washing fun and also make kids properly wash their hands. So with SoaPen, this is what it looks like.

Ryan Dye:
Yes, I’m glad you have one to show us.

Shubham Issar:
It comes in three colors. I have the blue one here, the pink and purple. You can draw with it on your hands. I’m not going to draw much, but the idea is that you… kids are encouraged to draw all over their hands and then in removing the traces of the drawing, they’re following the seven steps of hand washing. There are seven steps, which is crazy. They’re spending 20 to 40 seconds in removing the drawing from their hands. So they’re having fun, they’re not thinking of this activity as a chore, but something that’s like a fun activity. Seeing behavior change in time as that happens. That’s how we came up with the idea submitted to the challenge. Did not think we would win and we went to another round of submissions with them and went on to win the challenge. Got prize money to do R&D and the rest was history.

Ryan Dye:
That’s really cool because you… would you say that the challenge helped encourage your creativity? It wasn’t like you necessarily had developed something and then you went out seeking opportunities to pitch it necessarily. It’s like they went together.

Shubham Issar:
Yeah, not at all. The SoaPen wouldn’t have existing without the challenge. Design direction and guidelines, I think they can… sometimes parameters like that, they can instill more creativity than you can think. When we started brainstorming, both [inaudible] we had so many tools at our disposal at Parsons, so it’s pretty crazy. We were constantly prototyping on laser cutting machines, on CNCs, on… we had a wood shop to our disposal, a metal shop at our disposal. It was so crazy to-

Ryan Dye:
Right.

Shubham Issar:
Have those tools and that’s when we were like, “Okay, what can we make that can just be a prototype from cardboard and card stock and [inaudible] knives. What can we do?” I do think that having such little resources, actually made us a lot more creative.

Ryan Dye:
For sure. Well I think being in an environment that allows you to have all of that at your disposal really would help the creative process because you can try all kinds of things, and I think that would streamline it potentially. The process of going from this idea into making a product that you eventually get to the market and you had done prototypes that you say were with cardboard and card stock and just different things. How long did it take you then to get from this prototype to actually having a product that you felt like, “Yeah, there’s something marketable here.”

Shubham Issar:
I’d say paper to prototype really took about a year and a half to two years. So when we started, it was literally a sketch on paper that we won the challenge with and neither of us are chemical engineers. Finding that team of chemical engineers, I would say was one of the most challenging parts.

Ryan Dye:
So you won the competition though just with a drawing? There wasn’t something physical for people to see?

Shubham Issar:
No, no not at all.

Ryan Dye:
Yeah, that’s cool. Sorry, I interrupted you, but that was interesting point.

Shubham Issar:
No, no. I was thinking back. I was like… so what we did submit… so we did go back to schools… there are a lot of design tools, right? You have to be creative about it. To see if there is any merit in the concept. So when we started, we were like, “Okay, what can we use to replicate what we’re trying to say?” So there’s face crayons back home. So what we did was… it was like a combination of just seeing if kids even want to draw on their hands, if they like that, and when they’re washing off the drawing, if it ensures that they’re washing their hands for 20 to 40 seconds.

Ryan Dye:
Right.

Shubham Issar:
Now, it was like we didn’t have the SoaPen perse, in our hands, but there was a way we could test out the proof of concept. We went back home to Mumbai and Delhi and we worked with low income schools to see if it engages kids a little more, just the drawing aspect. So even when we didn’t have the prototype, we knew that there was in merit in this, because we started noticing that kids were more interested in hand washing if she just drew a drawing on their hand. That’s how we got started and the initial video, we just mocked up with… it was this triangular pen and it was this big. It was this big, and it had chalky exterior and it looked like… think like lipstick like soap and that was the initial submission.
The liquid soap that you see right now, it was actually a happy accident that happened and we ended up taking this direction. But the bar of soap is still something that we’re still developing, the very initial concept. So yeah, we started reaching out to different manufacturing places. It was pretty hard. I would say not from the industry, we were really young. We were 22 when we came up with the idea. We would have some good conversations on the phone, but I felt like as soon as we would land there in person, they would realize how inexperienced we were and all these problems would start popping up. Price quotes were given that were pretty reasonable and within our budget would just shoot high up. That was a pretty hard and challenging time.
How we’ve learned to counter challenges like that is surround yourself with experts in the fields that you don’t have any knowledge in. So we started connecting with more people who are in the CPT space, were in manufacturing and that’s how we got our first co-manufacturers contact. It was someone who was in the know. They were a veteran of the industry and they connected us and only then, could we go ahead with someone we could trust.

Ryan Dye:
Yeah, I would imagine that would be a big problem for a lot of people who are trying to develop a product, because first there’s the challenge of well where do I go to get this made? What are the complexities involved? And like you say, you had chemists working on a particular soap product and then you have the physical aspect of it and all these different things have to come together, and then there’s the challenge, okay well, let’s say we go somewhere, whether it’s made in India, China, United States, Mexico, wherever. You’re going to have people that will see you coming and go, “Oh, we’re going to take advantage here.” Well that’s no good. So I think having connections and having mentorship in that process I think is vital to getting you going in the right direction so mistakes aren’t made, or you have a problem where you’re taken advantage of. Did you go through a process where you needed to patent anything? Or how were trying to protect what you were doing?

Shubham Issar:
We have trademarks on the name in India and the US. So we have all that in place, but we realized pretty early on that this isn’t something that’s patentable.

Ryan Dye:
It’s not hardcore technology or anything.

Shubham Issar:
No, and it’s like you’re [inaudible] it’s soap. It’s been a thing for centuries. We’re essentially reappropriating a new use to soap, which isn’t patentable. That said, we have a very strong social mission. I think that sets us apart. The kids soap space is a very niche space. While there are big players in soap, the kids soap, hand soap specifically is a very niche space that no one is really looking into, which we had the advantage of being early players in, and I think now after coronavirus, that is a very important space for anyone to be playing in.

Ryan Dye:
Absolutely. I was going to ask you about that, with… obviously COVID has brought on significant focus in hand washing, which is good. With an increased demand for sanitizing products, how has that been in this process? You’re selling a product now and I would imagine, I know… I remember you had said it’s kind of hard to keep things in stock. You got to manufacture a lot and that’s great. I mean, it’s a great opportunity to sell your product, but I would imagine it’s hard to keep up with demand. Has that been true?

Shubham Issar:
Absolutely. Definitely growing pains. I think for a larger company, it would have been easier to keep up with the demand, but COVID has seen two sides. While I don’t have to explain to anyone why hand washing for 20 to 40 seconds is important now. I think there definitely is manufacturing troubles with production timelines and all sides have increased, supply chains, everywhere is stretched. So it’s taking us longer than it would take for us to be back in stock-

Ryan Dye:
Right.

Shubham Issar:
With SoaPen. But it’s also given us the opportunity to diversify our product basket. We were approached by a school that we worked with for SoaPen to see if we would become vendors for hand sanitizer and we never thought we’d be making something that is other than SoaPen, but we decided to go ahead with that and that has been a very interesting learning experience. How to market something that is a niche is a big learning experience for me and Amanat. Two sides to it, I would say definitely the production side of things is its harder to manage that pre-COVID.

Ryan Dye:
Do you feel that there are different business techniques that you may not have because you were at a design school, a great design school. You’ve developed this product, but how has that been as far as trying to make good business decisions aside from the actual product?

Shubham Issar:
Surrounding us with advisors pretty early on, close to the UNICEF incubator. The incubator provided us with a lot of support, a lot of mentorship and you learn, you learn on the job.

Ryan Dye:
Definitely.

Shubham Issar:
And make mistakes. I make a lot of mistakes and learn from those mistakes, but other than that, we’ve been part of the Halcyon Incubator, which is a [inaudible] incubator. We built a huge community through that.

Ryan Dye:
And Halcyon’s in Washington DC, is that correct?

Shubham Issar:
Yeah, it’s in DC. It’s such a cool incubator. Work and live in the same space and they take the pressure of having help paying for rent and all that stuff for six months away from you. It’s truly incredible and you truly feel supported on all angles and they’re there to be facilitating your success, which the best support we could have gotten. We were in a residency before that in New York and then post that, we have been a part of Mass Challenge. So building out communities because in national, the Pursuit Incubator, just being a part of more and more accelerators and incubators, that has been a big guiding step for us.

Ryan Dye:
Absolutely. Yeah, that is something that’s so vital and so important for any business or young entrepreneur. You’ve got to have support and it really helps to have people that can walk along beside you and give you advice when you need it and help you go in the right direction.

Shubham Issar:
And a good peer group. I think it’s really important to talk to other entrepreneurs as well because they have most likely been where you are at this point. I met so many people who have been through the exact same thing that we were going through and it was just like, “Wow, I really needed this.” I have been places that my peers need and it’s just great to give back in those senses.

Ryan Dye:
So with the different incubators that you’ve been connected with. Was part of the experience you went and… like for example, the James Dyson Award. Is that… and for our listeners, James Dyson, you’ve heard of Dyson vacuums, that’s the guy and one of the most successful inventors and entrepreneurs in the world. Was it a pitch even type process or was that more… how did you get funding with some of these organizations? I mean, we do pitch events at CoLab, so that’s the main way that we help support things financially.

Shubham Issar:
With the UNICEF challenge, it was more of an application process. So I think they had about… they had to pick from 200 designs and over 200 entries, or 2,000. We went through… they had the initial 10 picked out and then post that, we went through some training to define the idea more and then we submitted a video, which we pitched in the video. So that was the whole idea. You’re thinking about a very holistic approach to design. With the James Dyson Award, very similar. You were talk… James Dyson actually is an industrial designer and this was the competition to apply to in college.

Ryan Dye:
Absolutely.

Shubham Issar:
So happy when we won. That was, I think the biggest honor and that post that, the recognition and then the support that the foundation continues to give us, incredible. They’re a very inclusive community and we’re still involved in a lot of James Dyson events. We mentor people who have just… any projects that have won. I have been a mentor for them.

Ryan Dye:
That’s fantastic.

Shubham Issar:
[crosstalk] where we get the chance to give back as well, and then we’ve been a part of typical pitch competitions that you have a five minute pitch for a cast. We’ve been a part of the Toyota Mother of Invention Program, which was just they found us. We went through an hour long vetting interview and I think they narrowed down based on their criteria, incredible. That was an award [inaudible] that as well. So yeah, it’s been… we’ve actually not raised money yet, and we’ve only really survived [inaudible] awards.

Ryan Dye:
I was going to say you guys have been busy because that’s a lot of work to do. Those kinds of incubators and pitch events and things like that. I mean, to put everything together. Now that you have a product that’s on the retail side, kind of leads to my next thought is you have the challenge of trying to develop enough inventory and then distribution of that inventory. I would imagine, part of the goal is to be able to expand your product offerings in that manner. How do you see that playing out and what are some of the challenges and goals that you’re looking for in expanding?

Shubham Issar:
I think scaling is definitely something that we are working on. And again, as you said, do we go into retail? Retail has been a big dream of both [inaudible] and I. There are different ways to go about expanding the business and I think the retail side of things is super attractive to both of us, and I do believe that again, we’ll have to really [inaudible] more people to the team who understand that process a little more. Have been through some scaling that they have done with themselves. But also on the other hand, creating that brand. What does this… what do these range of products look like? Does going to a retail store with just one product even make sense? Probably not.
So we’ve been developing. As I mentioned, we started with a bar of soap idea. A crayon pink, lipstick that you can set up and [inaudible] That’s something we’re working on. A lot of parents ask for a body wash version of SoaPen, so something that kids can use in the bath.

Ryan Dye:
I would buy that for my kids.

Shubham Issar:
Definitely. That’s something that we’re working on. I would buy that for myself.

Ryan Dye:
Yeah. Exactly.

Shubham Issar:
So it would just be a larger packaging that is easier to roll on. So those are all the ideas that we have. I think in general, we’re both fun people, so we want to keep creating fun, everyday objects that make routine life a little more interesting. That’s the whole idea with the brand. We attached the idea of fun. Yeah, and I think for now we want to be in the kid space.

Ryan Dye:
I think that’s a great place to be and as you look to continue to scale, do you see yourself seeking venture capital? Or moving to that phase of funding? Because it would seem like that’s the logical next step to try to be able to have the right products, distribution, retail balance.

Shubham Issar:
Definitely. We’re currently in the midst of raising our [inaudible] ground. We are looking to raise now. More because we know we need the support to grow the team and need more brains behind this so that we can take advantage of the time that we’re in and move faster and I think we have very strong mission, and we’re very passionate about spreading hand hygiene awareness. We have a strong social mission attached to the brand and that’s what we want to really propel forward in the next coming few months.

Ryan Dye:
And your goal is you give back, what, 10% of sales? There is a mission focus.

Shubham Issar:
So with the sanitizer, we give 10% of all sales to COVID-19 relief funds and with SoaPen, we donate one for every three sold in the US. So we’ve done hand washing awareness campaigns in India and Vietnam and the Philippines. So the idea is that we’re taking the pens and using them as a teaching tool.

Ryan Dye:
That’s fantastic. Well I think you’re really poised for some pretty amazing things and as you say, here we are in the midst of a global pandemic and in some ways, people can look at this and go, “Oh, it’s such a challenging time and you can look at the negativities that we’re all dealing with, but at the same time, I think when we face challenges just as humans, often times that’s when great things happen and good ideas can thrive and survive. So here you have a product that is so fitting. We’re reminded of the importance of this, so I think to go back, this started when? 20…

Shubham Issar:

  1. Ryan Dye:
    2016 is when the product came out.

Shubham Issar:
2016 when we submitted to the challenge and 2018 is when the product launched on Amazon.

Ryan Dye:
Yeah, so you’re definitely in your infancy as it were, but what have been some of the highlights or some of the biggest challenges that you’ve faced that really stick out in this journey?

Shubham Issar:
Yeah, I think the highlight is definitely seeing SoaPen with kids. We try to do a lot of hand washing awareness campaigns within schools in New York as well, and I love seeing SoaPen in schools. Initially that’s what our whole idea of distribution was that schools, it’s a no brainer and we ended up putting that on the back burner because we realize that schools have a very long buying cycle and it’s very hard to approach. The bottom up approach was pretty hard, or the top down approach too. Getting in touch with superintendents, this and that for a small startup was too hard. Then I think that was a pretty big disappointment in the beginning when we started out that, “Oh, this isn’t something that’s going to work out.” Then now that we’re in COVID times, I feel like that interest from schools has started again, which is amazing. Especially for special needs school because kids with special needs sometimes have a hard time engaging in hand washing, or hand hygiene in general and when there is a fun tool like SoaPen, it’s just an easy way to start the conversation and to get kids interested in that.
I think that’s been one of the most… starting out in disappointment and now it’s turning into something that could still be promising.

Ryan Dye:
Where have your products manufactured right now? And has that been a challenge depending on location?

Shubham Issar:
SoaPen and I were… it’s made in the US. We get the component from overseas and that’s definitely been a challenge, because packaging timelines have been so long. Overall, in terms of domestic manufacturing, we feel really supported by our partners and that has gone on. Thankful that manufacturing is an essential service. I’m glad that that has gone on [inaudible]

Ryan Dye:
I have not necessarily thought of Iowa as a manufacturing center, but how did you connect with a manufacturer in the Midwest?

Shubham Issar:
Again, through mentors. As I was mentioning, early on we found a CPG veteran who was also Indian and he was just… I think took a like to us and was very generous with his resources. So we started developing SoaPen with them and the one who put us in touch with our manufacturers.

Ryan Dye:
Well I think that goes to show you, making connections and networking is, I think of the most important things you can do. In any business, not just… because you have to be able to connect with people who have resources in a way to help you turn a corner on a challenging situation.

Shubham Issar:
I think especially now my role has changed a little bit. I’m more in the sales side of things and it’s making me understand really the powers story, and also keeping your network, personal network in the clue. Like, “Hey, this is what we’re working on.” And I think people hate when you come out of the blue and ask them for things without giving them proper updates. So I think that’s one of the things that I’ve learned on my journey is that don’t go to your network when you haven’t asked. Go to them with gifts. Go to them with regular updates. Keep them posted and it’s just another way to keep your community strong.

Ryan Dye:
Absolutely. With how you started the company and the structure, how do you and your business partner, Amanat. Am I saying that right?

Shubham Issar:
[crosstalk] yeah.

Ryan Dye:
How do you figure out, “Okay, you have this responsibility. You have this responsibility.” How’s the synergy work in having a partner in the process?

Shubham Issar:
I think we’ve been very lucky in the fact that we like very different things. Amanat is very good with numbers, which I am not. I’m trying to be. I’m learning to be… I don’t think also I’ve realized that it’s not okay for a co-founder or founder to just go like, “I don’t like numbers.” That’s just not an option. You learn to like numbers.

Ryan Dye:
You better get on board.

Shubham Issar:
You better like numbers. So [inaudible] is better at it than I am and we’ve realized that I like sales and marketing side of things. Amanat is much better at operational production timelines. While we have very similar skillsets, we have very different likes and that’s been a huge bonus for us.

Ryan Dye:
That can be really important. Find each other’s strengths and put them all on the table. That’s really good.

Shubham Issar:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Ryan Dye:
Well is there any question that I didn’t ask that you may want to share or something that you have found interesting in this experience?

Shubham Issar:
I think kids come up with the wackiest ideas. That’s been my learning experience from all this. Is that never, ever stop being curious about what kids think, or what your users think and if I’m being general about it, what do your user think? What ideas do they have? Or what you could be doing next. I think that’s where most my inspiration comes from. Kids have the best ideas, you know? Some kid wanted a red velvet chocolate SoaPen and someone wants… they have all these amazing ideas and I feel like that’s what keeps us going. So being in touch with our users.

Ryan Dye:
Listen to your eight year old customer. They may have the best next idea.

Shubham Issar:
They really do. I truly believe that.

Ryan Dye:
I think that’s an excellent reminder. Well Shubham, thank you so much for talking with us today. How can people learn more about SoaPen or connect with you, or just be able to follow what’s going on?

Shubham Issar:
You can check us out on our website, www.soapen.com and we’re on all social media channels including Tik Tok. And our handle is @teamsoapen. T-E-A-M-S-O-A-P-E-N. Please DM us or email us anytime.

Ryan Dye:
Absolutely, and if you happen to be the acquisitions buyer for a major company out there, you definitely want to talk to these guys about-

Shubham Issar:
Yes. Yes.

Ryan Dye:
Getting their product, because for sure, it’s a great idea. It’s a great product. COVID or not, wash your hands people. 20 seconds or more. So Shubham, thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us today and we look forward to keeping in touch and seeing all the exciting ways that SoaPen is making an impact on hand hygiene around the world.

Shubham Issar:
Thank you for having me.

Ryan Dye:
Absolutely. Take care.

Shubham Issar:
You too.

Ryan Dye:
We’ll talk to you later, bye. I want To take a moment to tell our listeners about our exciting new series this fall called CoLab Webinar Wednesday. Similar to our podcast, this one hour webinar will feature some great personalities across our various areas of focus, which is nonprofit development, technology, film and media, lifestyle, real estate development and general entrepreneurship. We encourage you to attend these events as it will give you a chance to ask our guests questions on how they get from there to here.
Coming up on September 9, we will talk with Josh Donnelly. Former brand manager with Fiat USA and current director of marketing and creative at [inaudible] Josh will share three ways to update your upset and other important things to consider when marketing your company and brand. The webinars will take place between 12 and 1:00 PM Pacific Time on Wednesdays throughout the fall. To find out more on how to register, visit our website colabinc.org. In the meantime, follow, like and subscribe to CoLab Inc. on all the various social media platforms. Visit our website colabinc.org to see the various ways we help promote the spirit of entrepreneurship. If you have comments on today’s episode or know someone who would be a great guest on our show, send your suggestion to ryan@colabinc.org. We’d love to hear from you. Special thanks to our producer Michael [Webberly] editing by Tanya Musgrave and all the CoLab staff. Until next time, be well and god bless.